We don’t sell the Thinkblot anymore, sorry!

We've suggested some alternatives below you might like:

We did once and we had fun. But we've moved on. These things happen. We've suggested some alternatives below you might like:

Similar products to Thinkblot

    Product info

    Have you ever stared at a cloud, an inkblot or even a plate of scrambled eggs and convinced yourself you could see something within the amorphous mass? You know, Che Guevara playing the trombone; an upside-down outline of Africa with Barry Manilow's nose as Madagascar; a duck balancing a skyscraper on its beak. If you have you're going to love Thinkblot.

    Thinkblot

    Mental noting!

    If you haven't you're still going to love Thinkblot, because this brilliant mind-association game is one of the silliest diversions we've ever had the pleasure to play with. Created by the same bloke who invented Pictionary, Thinkblot is a fun version of those flip-chart tests psychologists are always using in the movies.

    The object is to spot as many different images in the blobs of black ink as your imagination can suggest within 90 seconds. But here's the really good bit: you have to convince opponents to see what you see in the inkblots. The more you see and persuade, the more you score!

    Thinkblot
    You can also rack up extra points if you spot something no one else has seen. And that's not as easy as it sounds, because we reckon some of the inkblots have been craftily constructed to look like specific things. (And there's us thinking we were being original when we said we could see Eric Bristow's face on the body of a giant caterpillar). What's more, rolling the dice forces you to spot things in particular categories. For example, you can only look for people or types of food within the blobs.

    Thinkblot
    If all this sounds insane, it is. It's also one of the most entertaining party games you're ever likely to play. In fact even if you abandon the rules and forget about the scoring, Thinkblot is still hilarious because the images can be interpreted in thousands of ways. Now, is that a hippo wearing a tutu or a banana with wings?

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    Product info

    Have you ever stared at a cloud, an inkblot or even a plate of scrambled eggs and convinced yourself you could see something within the amorphous mass? You know, Che Guevara playing the trombone; an upside-down outline of Africa with Barry Manilow's nose as Madagascar; a duck balancing a skyscraper on its beak. If you have you're going to love Thinkblot.

    Thinkblot

    Mental noting!

    If you haven't you're still going to love Thinkblot, because this brilliant mind-association game is one of the silliest diversions we've ever had the pleasure to play with. Created by the same bloke who invented Pictionary, Thinkblot is a fun version of those flip-chart tests psychologists are always using in the movies.

    The object is to spot as many different images in the blobs of black ink as your imagination can suggest within 90 seconds. But here's the really good bit: you have to convince opponents to see what you see in the inkblots. The more you see and persuade, the more you score!

    Thinkblot
    You can also rack up extra points if you spot something no one else has seen. And that's not as easy as it sounds, because we reckon some of the inkblots have been craftily constructed to look like specific things. (And there's us thinking we were being original when we said we could see Eric Bristow's face on the body of a giant caterpillar). What's more, rolling the dice forces you to spot things in particular categories. For example, you can only look for people or types of food within the blobs.

    Thinkblot
    If all this sounds insane, it is. It's also one of the most entertaining party games you're ever likely to play. In fact even if you abandon the rules and forget about the scoring, Thinkblot is still hilarious because the images can be interpreted in thousands of ways. Now, is that a hippo wearing a tutu or a banana with wings?