Sea Monkeys Space Shuttle Expedition

Not really monkeys, obviously
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ItÂ’s been 40 years since Harold von Braunhut came up with the notion of marketing brine shrimps as Sea Monkeys, when he looked into a barrel of fish food (the original use for the little buggers) and remembered the quirk about their eggs being dormant until they come into contact with salt water.

Until now, Sea Monkeys have been the preserve of the classified ads in American comic books and magazines like Viz. The promise of instant life for the price of a few weeksÂ’ pocket money always seemed like one hell of a good bargain. But in much the same manner as a fairground goldfish, Sea Monkeys make great pets until they die after a fortnight and get a tasteful sending-off down the nearest u-bend.

With childhood over, itÂ’s time to prove that cultivation of dried-out shrimps is a serious business. Well, as serious as tipping something called Living Plasma III into a plastic Space Shuttle can be. In case youÂ’re wondering, the NASA motif is in recognition of the fact that 400 million artemia salina once went up with John Glen, so that the legendary astronaut and his crew could look at how space affected their development. So there you go.

Frankly, who else out of your peers and contemporaries is going to have one of these unique devices on display?
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    Free UK Delivery Over £100
    Free Returns
    Next Day Delivery Not Available
    Free UK Delivery Over £100
    Free Returns
    Next Day Delivery Not Available
    Description
    ItÂ’s been 40 years since Harold von Braunhut came up with the notion of marketing brine shrimps as Sea Monkeys, when he looked into a barrel of fish food (the original use for the little buggers) and remembered the quirk about their eggs being dormant until they come into contact with salt water.

    Until now, Sea Monkeys have been the preserve of the classified ads in American comic books and magazines like Viz. The promise of instant life for the price of a few weeksÂ’ pocket money always seemed like one hell of a good bargain. But in much the same manner as a fairground goldfish, Sea Monkeys make great pets until they die after a fortnight and get a tasteful sending-off down the nearest u-bend.

    With childhood over, itÂ’s time to prove that cultivation of dried-out shrimps is a serious business. Well, as serious as tipping something called Living Plasma III into a plastic Space Shuttle can be. In case youÂ’re wondering, the NASA motif is in recognition of the fact that 400 million artemia salina once went up with John Glen, so that the legendary astronaut and his crew could look at how space affected their development. So there you go.

    Frankly, who else out of your peers and contemporaries is going to have one of these unique devices on display?

     

    More info
    You get the Space Shuttle tank with its little red light, magnifiers and water bubbler; some water purifying powder; a sachet of Growth Food; Living Plasma III (for when the Sea Monkeys have developed); a feeding spoon; illustrated instructions, and, of course, a packet of Sea Monkey eggs. The manufacturers guarantee the Sea Monkeys two years - if you need to start again in that time, the company will send you extra ingredients (all you pay is 50p handling and send an SAE). Sea Monkeys can grow up to 2cm in length. The Space Shuttle tank is about 25cm tall. The ShuttleÂ’s light requires 2 x AAA batteries. Spare bits available on 01438 746111.

     

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