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Neo-Kaiju
Neo-Kaiju
Neo-Kaiju
Neo-Kaiju

Neo-Kaiju

Good eggs? Neo-Kaiju are monstrously brilliant!
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Description

Mork from Ork's spaceship was shaped like one; Batman once described them as nature's perfect container; and Japanese TV hero Monkey sprang forth from a stone one. That's right, we're talking about eggs.

Why? Well for some strange reason eggs and cult figures go together like bacon and...er, eggs. Maybe that's why we were instantly drawn to the Neo-Kaiju series of mini-figures, as each quirky little monster comes in its own translucent egg capsule.

Neo-Kaiju Despite sounding like a Matrix-influenced jazz-fusion band, the Neo-Kaiju Project is actually a series of Japanese-style mini-monster figures, created by top US contemporary artists and designers. And as sure as eggs are eggs, these weird and wonderful art toys are already creating a monster buzz in the ever-expanding world of collectable mini-figures.

Neo-Kaiju The first Neo-Kaiju series features ten original designs by top-banana creatives Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, Seonna Hong, Kathy Staico Schorr and Todd Schorr. Each artist has designed two figures, one referencing a classic Japanese monster (Kaiju) and another of their own choosing.


Neo-Kaiju Just like Qees, Neo-Kaiju figures are blind packed so you don't know which one you're going to get (and neither do we). But that's what makes collecting these bizarre, beautifully detailed PVC figures such fun. Who knows, you could open your egg and discover Steam Punk, the winged weirdo by Todd Schorr; or you might get Birduzasu, the feathered freak by Tim Biskup.

Neo-Kaiju

Just like other limited edition art toys which are being traded on the net, Neo-Kaiju will be available in restricted quantities, so there's never been a better time to start collecting. Excited? You should be totally egg-static!
Neo-Kaiju

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    Free UK Delivery Over £100
    Free Returns
    Next Day Delivery Not Available
    Free UK Delivery Over £100
    Free Returns
    Next Day Delivery Not Available
    Description
    Mork from Ork's spaceship was shaped like one; Batman once described them as nature's perfect container; and Japanese TV hero Monkey sprang forth from a stone one. That's right, we're talking about eggs.

    Why? Well for some strange reason eggs and cult figures go together like bacon and...er, eggs. Maybe that's why we were instantly drawn to the Neo-Kaiju series of mini-figures, as each quirky little monster comes in its own translucent egg capsule.

    Neo-Kaiju Despite sounding like a Matrix-influenced jazz-fusion band, the Neo-Kaiju Project is actually a series of Japanese-style mini-monster figures, created by top US contemporary artists and designers. And as sure as eggs are eggs, these weird and wonderful art toys are already creating a monster buzz in the ever-expanding world of collectable mini-figures.

    Neo-Kaiju The first Neo-Kaiju series features ten original designs by top-banana creatives Gary Baseman, Tim Biskup, Seonna Hong, Kathy Staico Schorr and Todd Schorr. Each artist has designed two figures, one referencing a classic Japanese monster (Kaiju) and another of their own choosing.


    Neo-Kaiju Just like Qees, Neo-Kaiju figures are blind packed so you don't know which one you're going to get (and neither do we). But that's what makes collecting these bizarre, beautifully detailed PVC figures such fun. Who knows, you could open your egg and discover Steam Punk, the winged weirdo by Todd Schorr; or you might get Birduzasu, the feathered freak by Tim Biskup.

    Neo-Kaiju

    Just like other limited edition art toys which are being traded on the net, Neo-Kaiju will be available in restricted quantities, so there's never been a better time to start collecting. Excited? You should be totally egg-static!
    Neo-Kaiju

     

    More info

    PLEASE NOTE: Neo-Kaiju are 'blind packed', which means you don't know which one you are getting until you open the box. That's just part of the fun! If you decide to return your Neo-Kaiju once opened, we can only offer a refund in vouchers. This does not affect your statutory rights


    Size dimensions:
    • Egg capsules are approximately 3.7" (H) x 2.8" (W)
    Please note:
    • Some assembly may be required.
    • Not suitable for small children (ages 3 and up), as Neo-Kaiju contain small parts, and may be a choking hazard.
    Gary Baseman, designer of Pupik and Gefilte:
    Known for his freaky folks, dark and dopey blobs and eye catching colours, Baseman is the Emmy award winning creator of the animated cartoon (and now an animated feature!), "Teacher's Pet". His new book, "Dumb Luck", published by Chronicle Books, includes wonderful examples of his strange and alluring work and sheds light on the muddy spot where genius and stupidity has been smudged beyond recognition.
    http://www.garybaseman.com/


    Tim Biskup, designer of Birduzasu and Pigdog:
    Originally from California, Tim Biskup was raised on Disneyland, Rat Fink, badly dubbed Japanese Sci-Fi flicks, punk rock, skate-boarding and underground comics. In the mid-eighties he left Otis/Parsons School of Design to seek his fortune in the world of illustration. His career included designing for skateboard companies and record labels, (a highlight being his work for Ralph Records and his heroes the Residents). His obsession with the art of Mary Blair led him to a career in animation. This career has involved him in countless cartoons, including his own short "Freddy Seymore's Amazing Life" for Nickelodeon and background supervisor for Cartoon Network's "Time Squad". In 1998, Biskup began hosting and curating the Burning Brush auctions, has been in a vast array of exhibitions and has currently launched a line of t-shirts and gift items under the GAMA-GO label.
    http://www.timbiskup.com/ or http://www.flopdoodle.com/


    Seonna Hong, designer of Nuthugger and Tako Girl:
    Seonna Hong balances art, animation, and raising a family with her husband, fellow artist Tim Biskup. After graduating from California State University, Long Beach, she spent several rewarding years teaching art to children. In 1999, Seonna made the transition into painting backgrounds for animation, both feature and television, and was recently recognised by her peers with an Emmy award for her backgrounds on the feature film "Teacher's Pet", as well as an Annie award nomination for production design. Her current projects include "My Life as a Teenage Robot" with Frederator/Nickelodeon. "Princess" (2003) marked her first solo exhibition and she continues to keep her plate full with national and international gallery shows, and other fun projects that feature her doe-eyed little creatures. Seonna's work has also been published in the "Beatsville", "Sci-Fi Western" and "The Truth Show" books. Seonna also loves the hugs of squirrels and octopi.
    http://www.seonnahong.com/ or http://www.flopdoodle.com/


    Kathy Stacio-Schorr, designer of Treebird and Trilomonk:
    After attending the Philadelphia College of Art, Kathy moved to New York City where she worked as an illustrator until 1986. She then moved to rural Roxbury, CT and started painting for herself. Kathy's first major show was the First American Pop Culture Show Today at the Laforet Gallery in Tokyo, Japan. She has since exhibited in group shows in Los Angeles, New York City, San Francisco, Italy and is currently represented by the Merry Karnowsky Gallery in L.A. In 1999, Kathy moved from Connecticut to the sunnier, warmer temperatures of Los Angeles with husband Todd. Kathy was the feature cover artist for Juxtapoz Magazine in January 1997 and is currently working on a book of her paintings.
    http://www.mkgallery.com/


    Todd Schoor, designer of Humpty Djinn and Steam Punk:
    Todd Schoor's artistic journey is one that hardly conforms to the time-honoured stereotype of Bohemian artist. It is rather a post-war tale bracketed by an America infatuated with the limitless potential of consumerism. His formative years were spent in a world surrounded by the atomic and space ages, by Saturday morning cartoons and racks of comic books at the local drug store, a land populated by the Revell models, Mad Magazine, Testors glue, Mickey Mouse and Rat Fink. Further fuelling his developing image bank were the seemingly endless icons from television's early years: Robbie the Robot, Mighty Joe Yung and reel upon reel of animated toons from the likes of Tex Avery, George Pal and Max Fleisher. The compulsion to replicate these characters led to a formal art education and exposure to a new set of influences drawn from the world of advertising and commercial art.
    http://www.toddschorr.com/ or http://www.mkgallery.com/

     

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