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We don’t sell the Casio WQV-2 Wrist Camera anymore, sorry!

We've suggested some alternatives below you might like:

We did once and we had fun. But we've moved on. These things happen. We've suggested some alternatives below you might like:

Product info

Casio are really going for it in the wrist-tech stakes. Not content with their MP3 watch, they've created a digital camera to go alongside it. Sound from one wrist, pictures on the other. All that's needed to complete the set is some kind of brainwave-activated computer in the form of a pair of stylish sunglasses and the three-pin plug is history.

Until that glorious day, the WQV-1 is plenty to keep us occupied, as it's clearly one of the most impressive gadgets of the year.

It looks very much like a high-end digital watch and is more stylish and less obvious than other wrist data devices. A tiny, 1/14-inch sensor takes the black-and-white pictures, which show up on the 120 x 120 dot screen. Obviously, the quality isn't as good as a standard digital camera but for its size, the images are very impressive.

You can store up to 100 standard black-and-white images in the 1Mb memory, or download your favourites to computer via infra-red transfer (inter-WQV transfer is another option). A planned Merge mode lets you combine two images, a function that has endless amusement possibilities.

To see the watch in action, download this video.
Unless you've got them, you'll need Winzip and RealPlayer.

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Product info

Casio are really going for it in the wrist-tech stakes. Not content with their MP3 watch, they've created a digital camera to go alongside it. Sound from one wrist, pictures on the other. All that's needed to complete the set is some kind of brainwave-activated computer in the form of a pair of stylish sunglasses and the three-pin plug is history.

Until that glorious day, the WQV-1 is plenty to keep us occupied, as it's clearly one of the most impressive gadgets of the year.

It looks very much like a high-end digital watch and is more stylish and less obvious than other wrist data devices. A tiny, 1/14-inch sensor takes the black-and-white pictures, which show up on the 120 x 120 dot screen. Obviously, the quality isn't as good as a standard digital camera but for its size, the images are very impressive.

You can store up to 100 standard black-and-white images in the 1Mb memory, or download your favourites to computer via infra-red transfer (inter-WQV transfer is another option). A planned Merge mode lets you combine two images, a function that has endless amusement possibilities.

To see the watch in action, download this video.
Unless you've got them, you'll need Winzip and RealPlayer.